Ride With Cam Zink At Mammoth

Ride With Cam Zink At Mammoth

Ride With Cam Zink At Mammoth

Mr. Cam Zink is going to be hosting a couple clinics at the Mammoth Mountain Bike Park in July, along with a FREE ride day that’ll allow anyone with a bike park ticket to shred with one of the world’s best. You can sign up for the clinics on the Mammoth website HERE and they’re super affordable – $25 for each of the two hour clinics or $40 for both. 

Mammoth PR image

(photo courtesy of Peter Morning/MMSA)

Schedule: 

Saturday, July 26: 
Cam will lead two sessions, one in the morning focusing on jumps and another in the afternoon on downhill technique
– Morning (Session 1): Jumps, 10am-12:30am
– BREAK: Lunch & watch Cam session the Richter jump, 1pm
– Afternoon (Session 2): Downhill technical, 1:30pm-4pm

Sunday, July 27: 
FREE ride day with Cam from 10am-2pm, meet at the Adventure Center at 9:45am. 
Bike Park ticket or pass required.

www.mammothmountain.com

UCI Cyclo-cross Development Camp: young talents improve skills at World Cycling Centre

UCI Cyclo-cross Development Camp: young talents improve skills at World Cycling Centre

UCI Cyclo-cross Development Camp: young talents improve skills at World Cycling Centre

UCI Cyclo-cross Development Camp: young talents improve skills at World Cycling Centre

UCI Cyclo-cross Development Camp: young talents improve skills at World Cycling Centre

They come from Denmark, Great Britain, Italy, Sweden and Switzerland, and are among the most promising Junior and Under-23 cyclo-cross specialists in their countries. This week they are training together at the World Cycling Centre under the expert eyes of Beat Wabel (Switzerland), a former Junior World Champion and nine-time Swiss Champion, and Geoff Proctor (USA), team manager for the USA World Cyclo-cross Championships Junior and U23 Team. Both men are members of the UCI Cyclo-cross Commission.

On the agenda: pre-breakfast cross training, technical skills, endurance rides and classroom sessions. Hours are spent in the grounds of the World Cycling Centre practising starting techniques, bunny hopping, cornering, shouldering bikes, and more.

“There is always something more to learn,” says Switzerland’s Junior National Champion Johan Jacobs, who finished 6th in the 2014 UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships in his first year as a junior. Already part of the UCI training camp in 2013 he did not hesitate to return this year: “It is such a good place to train because everything is here, sandpits, obstacles, the forest… You also learn a lot from the other riders and have a fun at the same time. It is important to have fun, it helps you push yourself to your limit,” says the 17-year-old who will aim for a podium spot at the 2015 UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships in Tabor (CZE).

Great Britain’s Hannah Payton also returns to the camp for a second time: “I learnt a lot last year and now I want to improve the skills that I have already.”

Ranked fourth in her country Payton has role models such as British stars Helen Wyman and Nikki Harris (3rd and 5th respectively at the 2014 World Championships). Twenty-year-old Payton, who has experience in World Cups and World Championships, will make the Under-23 race of the European Championships in Lorsch (GER) in November one of her major goals next season.

Geoff Proctor underlines that the camp does not focus on performance, as many of the athletes are in the middle of road, track and/or mountain bike racing: “The camp is designed to provide transitional training and mental refreshment in a non-competitive but focused environment… Emphasis is on the big picture – what riders need to be working on, how to map out the cyclo-cross season and ways to help increase the popularity of cyclo-cross in their own countries.

“We want to reach out to the nations, and these riders can go back home and share their knowledge and experience with their National Federations and clubs,” concludes Proctor.

UCI Off-Road Manager Peter Van den Abeele stresses that the camp can play an important part in the development of cyclo-cross in countries that do not necessarily have a strong tradition in the discipline or, as is the case in Switzerland, help bring a former leading nation back to the forefront.

“This is the third consecutive year that the UCI organises this development camp, and experience has shown that the athletes who come here can make enormous progress,” he said. “The UCI Cyclo-cross Commission is committed to getting more riders and nations involved in cyclo-cross, and we are extremely fortunate to have two dedicated commission members running this camp.

UCI Mountain Bike Marathon World Championships: symbolic race for Sauser

UCI Mountain Bike Marathon World Championships: symbolic race for Sauser

UCI Mountain Bike Marathon World Championships: symbolic race for Sauser

UCI Mountain Bike Marathon World Championships: symbolic race for Sauser

UCI Mountain Bike Marathon World Championships: symbolic race for Sauser

At 38 years old, Christoph Sauser has one of the most impressive track records in the history of mountain bike. The Swiss rider started off as a downhill specialist, notably participating in the 1993 UCI World Championships in Métabief. But his career really took off on the cross-country circuits. Bronze medallist at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games, double UCI World Cup winner (2004 and 2005) including 12 race victories, then 2008 World Champion, he moved away from cross-country at the end of the 2012 season to concentrate on long distance. Today he is triple World Champion in the specialty (2007, 2011, 2013), something which no rider before him has achieved.

The man from Sigriswil, a village in the Berne region, faces a very special challenge: for the Swiss athlete spends part of the year in South Africa, next to Stellenbosch and over the years has developed close ties with this country. He is even at the origin of a charitable association, Songo.info, which uses cycling to improve the sort of children living in townships. To win the Worlds in his country of adoption would be a poignant symbol: “I am in the shape of my life. The Worlds are the main goal of my season. There is

nothing more amazing that that moment you are on the podium and you receive the jersey. This race is as if I was riding at home,” confides Sauser.

After BMX (2010) and mountain bike (2013), Pietermaritzburg welcomes its third UCI World Championships. The city in the province of KwaZulu-Natal has also been a UCI World Cup venue since 2009.

Several former World Champions will also take the start, such as Switzerland’s Ralph Näf (2006), the Belgian Roel Paulissen (2008, 2009) and the Greek Ilias Periklis (2012). Who will be the winner at the end of the 95km course?

Women: Who will succeed Dahle?

Gunn-Rita Dahle has chosen not to defend her marathon world title. The Norwegian star is currently in Livigno, Italy, training for the second part of the season. Eight years after her victory in Rotorua, New Zealand, she dreams of reclaiming the Olympic cross-country rainbow jersey in front of her home crowd in Hafjell in September.

In her absence, the race in Pietermaritzburg will be more open than ever. Denmark’s Annika Langvad, winner in 2011 and 2012 would appear to be the best placed for victory. Winner of the mythical Cape Epic at the beginning of the season, Langvad will be up against the new European Champion Tereza Hurikova (CZE). Then there is England’s Sally Bigham, silver medallist last year, who could just ride the race of her life to become the first British winner of a UCI Mountain Bike Marathon World Championships.

Others to look out for in the list of favourites include Switzerland’s Ester Süss and Germany’s Sabine Spitz, who won the title in 2009 and 2010.

Racing will be streamed live on the organiser’s official website from 7.55am (CET and local time) Sunday.

Re-Cycle! Zimtstern Skoll Men’s Bike Jersey LS

Re-Cycle! Zimtstern Skoll Men’s Bike Jersey LS

Re-Cycle! Zimtstern Skoll Men’s Bike Jersey LS



The Zimtstern Skoll Jersey is the world’s first* MTB-Freeride Jersey made from recycled polyester** and bluesign® approved fabric!
Zimtstern Skoll Men s Bike Jersey LS www.zimtstern.com
Recycled polyester uses less energy and a lot less water than what is needed to make virgin Polyester. Furthermore this special fabric is upgraded with the Sanitized® hygiene function, a lasting antibacterial treatment. This safe Swiss technology acts like a built-in deodorant and prevents the development of unpleasant odours.

This unique fabric is certified as bluesign® approved! That means the fabric meets the strict safety and environmental requirements of the bluesign® criteria:
– Responsible use of resources
– Safety for people and the environment
– Eliminating substances posing risks to people and the environment from the beginning

The Skoll Zimtstern bike jersey leaves the biker-heart nothing to be desired. A contrast-colored star insert adorns your chest and provides the distinctive Zimtstern look. The ultra lightweight Invader Mesh material and the additional complete side mesh inserts give you the ultimate “I don’t give a f#%§ how hot it is”-ventilation. Whether in the park or on your favorite trail, the Relax Fit, the multi-panel construction and the elastic gusset on the cuffs give maximum freedom of movement and fits incredibly well, with or without body armor.

* Probably
**Composition: 97% recycled polyester, 3% polyester

www.zimtstern.com

Schwalbe Announces Dual Chamber Tire System Details

Schwalbe Announces Dual Chamber Tire System Details

Schwalbe Announces Dual Chamber Tire System Details

We first experienced Schwalbe’s new dual chamber tire and wheel system back in February, but at that time Schwalbe wasn’t ready to reveal its inner workings. The system, now called Procore, has already seen success on both the World Cup DH and Enduro World Series circuits, and now details are being released that confirm our suspicions about what the inner workings involve. The official press release from Schwalbe is below. – Mike Kazimer 


Schwalbe Procore


No more snake-bite punctures: A revolutionary dual chamber system makes it possible to ride with very low air pressures and, as a result, improve tire performance enormously. Initially, Schwalbe and the wheel manufacturer Syntace were working on such a system independently of each other. Now, the two companies have joined forces to further develop the dual chamber system.

With low air pressure, off-road tire performance improves significantly. The tires can adapt better to the terrain and react far more sensitively. They roll more easily over uneven ground and provide more grip and control. “But one can hardly risk riding on standard MTB tires with less than 1.5 bar (20psi), because the risk of snake bites is simply too great”, explains Markus Hachmeyer, Senior Product Manager. With the current trend towards wide wheel rims, the trail performance of the tires at low air pressure is improved and has become less “spongy”. The risk of snake bites, however, remains the same.

The solution is an innovative dual chamber system. There is an additional air chamber inside the tire. This inner chamber is filled with high air pressure (55-85psi) and effectively prevents the tire hitting the edge of the rim. At the same time, the inner system also secures the tire on the rim and prevents the dreaded “burping”, a loss of air of the tubeless system in the case of low pressure. Depending on the situation, the air pressure in the outer chamber can now be reduced to 1 bar (14psi) without running any risk. 

Schwalbe Dual Valve. Matt Wragg photo.

Nico Lau rode the system to victory at the Tweedlove stop of the Enduro World Series, and Emmeline Ragot and Sam Hill both stood on the podium at Fort William after running the Procore system. Photo: Matt Wragg. 

“All test cyclists to date have been thrilled with the new possibilities,” reports Markus Hachmeyer and recaps the feedback: 

With one bar (14psi), the tire grip is incredible. The contact surface is very large and the tires seldom, if ever, slide on loose ground. Even on the roughest terrain, the tires literally stick to the ground. The tire is the most sensitive cushioning element on the bike. The extra cushioning and traction because of the low air pressure leads to much better control over the bike and allow distinctly higher speeds.All this without the risk of snake-bite punctures. Dented rims become a thing of the past. Significantly lighter tires can be used in even the toughest conditions. What is more, the additional air chamber has excellent emergency running characteristics.

Schwalbe Procore


In order to exploit the advantages of the low tire pressure without risking a puncture, Schwalbe and Syntace were working on the same idea independently of each other and had also applied for patents. Now, the two companies are pooling their know-how to develop the system to market maturity. “At the latest at the Eurobike, we will be able to present precise information regarding design and prices,” says Markus Hachmeyer. Schwalbe will be responsible for the production and marketing of the system that is expected to be compatible with conventional tires and rims with a minimum internal width of 23mm. Weight is expected to be less than 200g.