The value of current cyclists revealed

The value of current cyclists revealed

The value of current cyclists revealed

The value of current cyclists revealed

The value of current cyclists revealed

Calculations carried out by Newcycling, Newcastle’s cycling campaign, using HEAT, an internationally acclaimed economic assessment tool for walking and cycling, show that the contribution that current city commuter cyclists make is worth over £3 million to the city of Newcastle every year.

Using the latest Census 2011 data and feeding it into the economic assessment tool, the campaign group calculates that Newcastle’s 3,300 commuter cyclists save the city over £3.3 million in costs simply by living healthier and more productive lives.

Last year’s Get Britain Cycling report states that at least £10 per head per year is needed – that call was also reiterated by the Transport Committee last month. This rate must rise with time to Dutch investment levels of £20 plus. For Newcastle with a population of 300,000 this means that a minimum £3 million should be invested in cycling improvements per year; incidentally the sum the Cycle City Ambition Fund provides till 2015.

This investment is also vital to provide better infrastructure for the rising number of people cycling, so more people are attracted to cycling and cyclists stay safe, and so creating a virtuous circle. With current cyclists saving the city that exact same cost, the value of present pedallers becomes clear. In a sustainable economy, valuing longterm trends and internalised costs, it is easy see the high level of contribution that current bike commuting makes to the city.

Katja Leyendecker, group chair, says: “Valuing cyclists is so important. We already make a massive contribution to society and city life and we want to see that recognised. As every cyclist knows our travel choice is undervalued – cycling can be a struggle. We all have seen and experienced bad and downright dangerous road layouts, abuse by drivers and inadequate implementation of improvements plans and even removal of perfectly good cycling infrastructure.

“With £3.3 million saved and 3,300 city cyclists, you could say that every commuting cyclist chucks in £1,000 into society’s piggybank every year just by cycling to work. That’s a fiver for each 6-mile commute they make. We really must value cyclists more.”

HEAT tool http://heatwalkingcycling.org/
Get Britain Cycling http://allpartycycling.org/inquiry/
Transport Committee http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-sele…

Cycle Coventry

Cycle Coventry

Cycle Coventry

Cycle Coventry banner

Cycle Coventry is a three year project which aims to improve facilities for cyclists and pedestrians in Coventry. The project will see more than £6 million invested between 2012 and 2015 to create a network of cycle routes that will link residential areas such as Henley, Tile Hill, Foleshill and Canley with jobs and education and local services. The project will use grant funding secured following a local bid led by the City Council and a regional bid led by Centro to the government’s Local Sustainable Transport Fund. The City Council secured £3.5 million and Centro secured £33 million of which £3.4 million will be spent in Coventry.

Cycle Coventry will connect existing pedestrian and cycle routes together, improve or create new routes to avoid busy roads and provide new crossing facilities. New route signage will be installed to ensure everyone can access the routes easily and new and secure cycle parking will be installed in local areas, railway stations and at employment sites to make cycling even easier.

It’s not just about the routes though – Cycle Coventry will also provide practical information and support to encourage more people, of all ages, to enjoy the health and recreational benefits of cycling. New cycle maps will encourage people to explore more of the city by bike. Bike maintenance and cycle training for adults will encourage people who might not have been on a bike for years to have a go.

The project will focus on the southwest and northeast of the city covering the residential areas of Canley, Tile Hill, Henley, Foleshill and the city centre.

Download the original bid document and a map of the proposed route.

Whats your council doing for cycle safety?

http://www.coventry.gov.uk/cycling