2014 UCI Track World Championships: four titles for four different nations

2014 UCI Track World Championships: four titles for four different nations

2014 UCI Track World Championships: four titles for four different nations

2014 UCI Track World Championships: four titles for four different nations

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Australia’s pursuit team and the German pair of Miriam Welte and Kristina Vogel in the women’s team sprint remained on top of the world but there were newcomers as well in the first day of the World Championships in Cali with victories by New Zealand in the men’s team sprint and Belgium’s Kelly Druyts in the women’s Scratch.

Men’s pursuit – Australia still rules

Only second in the qualifications behind Denmark, the Aussies finally upstaged the Danes in the final. And even with a team reshuffled by half from last year’s worlds in Minsk, they still kept the upper hand. Luke Davison, Glenn O’Shea, Alexander Edmondson and Mitchell Mulhern triumphed in 3:57.907 to earn their country’s tenth crown in the discipline since 1993.

Edmonson, twice crowned at the age of 20, said: “We knew it would not be easy against the Danes but we rode our own race without watching the others. We needed to stay focused. We came here with a lot of experience and knowing we had done the right preparation.” Denmark, with Casper Von Folsach, Lasse Norman Hansen, Rasmus Christian Quaade and Alex Rasmussen clocked 3:59.623. In the third place final, New Zealand’s Aaron Gate, Pieter Bulling, Dylan Kennett and Ryan Marc beat the Russians to take the bronze in 3:58.989.

 

Women’s team sprint – Welte and Vogel keep their crown

Unbeaten this season and world champions since 2012, Kristina Vogel and Miriam Welte were again too strong for the opposition. In the final, they outshone China’s Junhong Lin and Tianshi Zhong. Britain’s Jessica Varnish and Rebecca James took the best over Russia for the bronze. Vogel was over the moon and more confident than ever for the individual event: “I only have one world to say – treble! I’m really proud of what we achieved tonight,” she said. Welte was also delighted: “I can’t believe we are world champions again.” In the short history of women’s team sprint, which started in 2007, Germany are now on par with Australia, crowned between 2009 and 2011.

 

Men’s team sprint – New Zealand at last

After the bronze medal in 2012 and silver in 2013, New Zealand continued their steady progression to clinch the men’s team sprint world title in Cali. Ethan Mitchell, Sam Webster and Edward Dawkins stopped favourites and title-holders Germany from a double. “It’s a childhood dream come true, I can’t stop smiling,” said Dawkins. Rene Enders, Robert Forstermann and Maximilian Levy had to be content with the runner-up spot. Third last year, France again finished on the last podium place with the Olympic silver medal trio of Gregory Beauge, Kevin Sireau and Michael D’Almeida.

 

Women’s scratch – The new queen is Belgian

Third in 2012, Kelly Druyts achieved a career high to seize the rainbow jersey in the Scratch. Thanks to the title, the first for Belgium, she prevented Poland’s Katarzyna Pawlowska from making it three in a row. The Pole, crowned in the last two editions, had to be content with silver this time. Russia’s Evgenia Romanyuta came third.

The events are broadcast live on www.youtube.com/ucichannel

 

UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships: Highest participation since 2010

UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships: Highest participation since 2010

UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships: Highest participation since 2010

UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships: Highest participation since 2010

Until now, the 2010 Cyclo-cross World Championships in Tabor, the Czech Republic, held the record for the highest number of participants. That record, of 229 athletes competing across the four categories, will be equalled this weekend in Hoogerheide, the Netherlands.

When the small Dutch town was awarded the 2014 Cyclo-cross World Championships, organiser Jan Prop said: “We want it to be bigger and better than in 2009.” Mission accomplished. For when Hoogerheide hosted the Worlds five years ago, 214 athletes lined up at the start over the two days of competition.

Alongside the traditionally strong European countries, this year’s field includes a more than healthy participation from all over the world. Macedonia and Serbia, both new to the Cyclo-cross World Championships, each has a rider racing in the Junior Men category on Saturday morning. Also of note among the 23 participating countries is Australia, in all categories, and New Zealand with two Elite Men riders including the popular moustached Alex Revell. Japan is well represented with seven athletes, and the United States, one year after hosting the first World Championships ever to be held outside Europe, has arrived in the Netherlands with a full contingent of 22.

There is a positive trend in the women’s field, which sees 45 athletes from 14 nations taking part, compared to 38 riders from 12 countries the last time the Worlds were held in Hoogerheide.

The increase in Junior Men riders is even more remarkable: 59 riders from 19 nations compared with 51 athletes from 15 nations in 2009.

The Junior Men and Elite Women will race on Saturday, followed by the Men Under-23 and Elite Men on Sunday.

Photo: The number of athletes competing this weekend in Hoogerheide will equal the record established in Tabor (CZE) in 2010.

Switzerland hosts 2013 UCI Indoor Cycling World Championships

Switzerland hosts 2013 UCI Indoor Cycling World Championships

000indoorThe St. Jakobshalle in Basel, Switzerland, will provide the stage for the 2013 UCI Indoor Cycling World Championships from November 22nd to 24th.  Some 150 athletes from 17 countries will compete for the rainbow jersey in cycle-ball and the five artistic cycling categories: men single, women single, women pairs, women 4 and open 4.

Reigning cycle-ball World Champions, the Swiss team of Roman Schneider and Dominik Planzer, will be looking to confirm their title in front of their home crowd. However they will be up against tough competition from the Germans and the Austrians who are always among the favourites of this spectacular and exciting discipline.

Last year, Germany made a clean sweep of the artistic cycling titles. Other medals went to Austria, Hong Kong and Switzerland, all of whom will be present and aiming to take over the No 1 spot in the world.

Swiss Television SRF2 (Schweizer Radio Fernsehen) will broadcast live some of the action on the last day of competition. Meanwhile, some 5000 spectators are expected to attend the competitions.

Switzerland has hosted the UCI Indoor Cycling World Championships nine times since 1956, but this is only the second time in 50 years that the Worlds come to Basel. Built in 1976, the St Jakobshalle is particularly known for hosting the Swiss Indoors tennis tournament, part of the ATP World Tour.

Photo: Last year’s cycle-ball finalists, Switzerland and Austria, will once again be among the favourites.

The St. Jakobshalle in Basel, Switzerland, will provide the stage for the 2013 UCI Indoor Cycling World Championships from November 22nd to 24th.  Some 150 athletes from 17 countries will compete for the rainbow jersey in cycle-ball and the five artistic cycling categories: men single, women single, women pairs, women 4 and open 4.

Reigning cycle-ball World Champions, the Swiss team of Roman Schneider and Dominik Planzer, will be looking to confirm their title in front of their home crowd. However they will be up against tough competition from the Germans and the Austrians who are always among the favourites of this spectacular and exciting discipline.

Last year, Germany made a clean sweep of the artistic cycling titles. Other medals went to Austria, Hong Kong and Switzerland, all of whom will be present and aiming to take over the No 1 spot in the world.

Swiss Television SRF2 (Schweizer Radio Fernsehen) will broadcast live some of the action on the last day of competition. Meanwhile, some 5000 spectators are expected to attend the competitions.

Switzerland has hosted the UCI Indoor Cycling World Championships nine times since 1956, but this is only the second time in 50 years that the Worlds come to Basel. Built in 1976, the St Jakobshalle is particularly known for hosting the Swiss Indoors tennis tournament, part of the ATP World Tour.

Photo: Last year’s cycle-ball finalists, Switzerland and Austria, will once again be among the favourites.

Artistic cycling

Artistic cycling

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The first official artistic cycling World Championships were held in 1956. This sport is most popular in Germany, where there are no fewer than 10000 licence holders.

This sport is comparable to ice-skating and artistic gymnastics. The competitors (individuals or pairs) present a 5-minute programme set to music. The jury awards marks for the quality of the performance.

Temple of British track cycling to host first leg of World Cup

Temple of British track cycling to host first leg of World Cup

PICTURE BY ALEX BROADWAY/SWPIX.COM - Cycling - UCI Track Cycling World Cup Manchester - Day 1 - National Cycling Centre, Manchester, England - 01/11/12 - Great Britain celebrate victory in the Women's Team Pursuit Final.The UCI Track World Cup kicks off this weekend in the iconic Manchester venue, which has launched the career of so many track legends.

Three generations of riders have wedded their history to that of the Manchester velodrome, which has been part of the world track cycling landscape since 1995. Florian Rousseau, Sir Chris Hoy and Victoria Pendleton left their mark on the three editions of the World Championships (1996/2000/2008) hosted there. This is where the 2013/2014 UCI Track World Cup will begin, before heading to Aguascalientes in Mexico (5 to 7 December). The host city of the third leg, scheduled for the beginning of January, will be decided next week.

The new season also marks some changes in the qualification system. Beginning this season, riders must have participated in a number of Grands Prix in order to secure an individual entry.
Coming two weeks after the European Championships in Apeldoorn (Netherlands), where Germany, Great Britain and Russia took three titles each, plus 20 medals between them (out of 39 awarded), the British weekend is also the first step on the road to the World Championships in Cali (26 February – 2 March). Competing on home ground at its own national cycling centre, British Cycling will field an impressive line-up of 17 athletes, including Jason Kenny, Philip Hindes, Steven Burke, Ed Clancy, Dani King, Joanna Rowsell and Laura Trott, Olympic champions all.

Cycling Australia, meanwhile, is hoping to use Manchester as a launch pad for Joshua Harrison and Elissa Wundersitz, World Champion and bronze medallist respectively in the team pursuit at last summer’s event in Glasgow’s Chris Hoy velodrome. Three months ago Australia dominated the Junior Worlds, winning six gold medals and giving some idea of the nation’s potential. The women’s team pursuit competition is also breaking new ground, featuring teams of four riders for the first time.

German athletes Maximilian Levy (European keirin champion) and Kristina Vogel (European sprint champion), and François Pervis of France (world kilometre champion) will also be among the star riders of the three days of competition that begin on Friday.

Events will be available to watch live on youtube.com/ucichannel.